DEPARTMENT

Our mission is to create better lives for Minnesota’s disabled veterans and their families.

Treaties are signed and the battles of nations end, but the personal battles of those disabled in war only begin when the guns fall silent.

These men and women must struggle to regain health, reshape lives transformed by disability, learn new trades or professions, and rejoin the civilian world. At each step, they need help to help themselves. At each step, the Disabled American Veterans of Minnesota is there for them.

Who we are.

The Disabled American Veterans of Minnesota is membership group made up of women and men who have been disabled in our nation’s defense.

What we do.

We are dedicated to one clear mission – to better the lives of Minnesota’s disabled veterans and their families. We employ a variety of strategies to help us achieve this mission:

  • We provide free, professional assistance to veterans and their families in obtaining benefits and services earned through military service and provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and other agencies of government;
  • We provide outreach concerning its program services to the American people generally and to disabled veterans and their families specifically;
  • We represent the interests if disabled veterans; their families; their widowed spouses and their orphans before Congress, the White House, and the Judicial Branch, as well as state and local government;
  • We extend DAV’s mission of hope into the communities where these veterans and their families live through a network of state-level Departments and local Chapters; and
  • We provide a structure through which disabled veterans can express their compassion for their fellow veterans through a variety of volunteer programs.

Continuing a legacy that spans nearly a century.

Formed in 1920 and chartered by Congress in 1932, the Disabled American Veterans is the official voice of America’s service-connected disabled veterans — a strong, insistent voice that represents Minnesota’s disabled veterans, their families and survivors.

When the troops came home from World War I, 300,000 carried grim reminders of war: disabling injuries, battle scars, gas-seared lungs, and prolonged illnesses. Following a tumultuous hero’s welcome, America wiped the horror of war from its mind almost as quickly as the ticker tape was swept from the streets of New York City. The nation’s makeshift response to the needs of its disabled heroes soon broke down. These angry young veterans took matters into their own hands, starting local self-help groups that soon merged to become the DAV.

Since then we in Minnesota, as well as other chapters across the nation, including the national DAV, have served as the official voice of America’s service-connected disabled veterans — a strong, insistent voice that represents all of America’s 3 million disabled veterans, their families and survivors.

Our network of services — free of charge to all veterans and members of their families — is totally supported by membership dues and charitable contributions from the American public.